41st Annual Maize Genetics Conference Program

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

 

Concerning Meals

 

All meals will be served buffet style

Breakfast will be served in the Ballroom from 7:00-8:30 AM

Lunch will be served in the Ballroom from 12:30-1:30 PM

Dinner will be served in the Ballroom from 6:00-7:00 PM

Coffee, tea and soft drinks are available at no charge during beverage breaks

Informal Meeting Place: IMPORTANT NOTICE

Rooms 6102/6104 will be available for informal socializing each evening until 4AM. These are "private party rooms" and beer may be brought in as such. However, you will have to stay in these rooms if you are carrying drinks and dispose of your trash and bottles in the party room, NOT elsewhere in the hotel. These are reasonable policies from the hotel, and your compliance with them is extremely important.

Talks and Posters

Talks and Workshops will be presented in Forum A

Posters will be presented in Forum BC, adjacent to the talks

Posters may be hung up on Thursday evening, and must be removed by NOON Sunday

Steering Committee

Please share your suggestions or comments about the meeting with the Steering Committee

Julie Vogel, co-chair Al Kriz

Cliff Weil, co-chair Jane Langdale

Becky Boston Mike McMullen

Ben Bowen Neelima Sinha

Kelly Dawe Karen Cone, treasurer, ex officio

Marty Sachs, Local Organizer

Acknowledgements

 

Many thanks to the members of the Community for participating in this year’s experiment with electronic abstract submission. Your efforts are highly appreciated. It has been an outstanding success a full year ahead of schedule thanks largely to the work of Mary Polacco and her colleagues at the University of Missouri. Please address any comments or suggestions about electronic submission either to Cliff Weil or to Mary Polacco.

 

NEXT MAIZE MEETING: 19-22 March 2000, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Local Organizer: CliffWeil, cweil@uidaho.edu

41st Annual Maize Genetics Conference

March 1999

THURSDAY, 11 March

6:00-7:00 PM DINNER

7:15-7:30 PM ANNOUNCEMENTS

7:30-9:00 PM PLENARY TALKS Chair: Cliff Weil

7:30 Sue Wessler, Univ. of Georgia

MITEs: Transposable elements that create allelic diversity and serve to anchor a novel class of "smart" molecular markers

8:15 Philip Benfey, New York Univ.

Radial patterning in root and shoot development

 

 

FRIDAY, 12 March

7:00-8:30 AM BREAKFAST

8:30-10:00AM SESSION #1 Chair: Jane Langdale

DEVELOPMENT 1

8:30 Mike Scanlon, Univ. of Georgia

semaphore1: a recessive mutation disrupting knox gene expression in shoots

8:45 Paula McSteen, Plant Gene Expression Center

barren inflorescence2 is required for axillary meristem initiation/maintenance

9:00 Anne Sylvester, Univ. of Idaho

Balanced cell growth during maize leaf morphogenesis: Analysis of cell pattern mutations

RNA AND PATHOGEN RESPONSES

9:15 Shailesh Lal, Univ. of Florida

In vivo analysis of pre-mRNA splicing mutants at the Brittle-2 and Shrunken-2 loci in maize

9:30 Don Baldwin, Pioneer Hi-Bred

RNA transcript profiling for detecting early maize responses to a fungal pathogen and its toxin

9:45 Georgia Davis, USDA-ARS CHPRRU, Mississippi

QTL for Aflatoxin Reduction in Maize

10:00-10:30AM BREAK WITH BEVERAGES

 

10:30-12:00PM SESSION #2 Chair: Mike McMullen

COMPARISONS OF MAIZE LINES

10:30 Bob Bird, NC State Univ.

Sampling the Zea Universe: A Test Array

10:45 Mary Alleman, Duquesne Univ.

The origin of structural complexity at the maize r1 locus

11:00 Dave Weber, Illinois St. Univ.

Comparative recombination distances among varieties of Zea mays L.

RECOMBINATION

11:15 Steve Stack, Colorado St. Univ.

Synaptonemal complex karyotype for maize

11:30 Dave Selinger, Univ. of Arizona

The b locus has an unusually high frequency of nucleotide substitutions in the upstream region and contains a recombinational hotspot with distinct borders.

11:45 Bill Eggleston, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.

Rate and pattern of homologous recombination at the maize R1 locus

12:30-1:30PM LUNCH

1:30-3:00PM POSTER SESSION I Contributors will be at ODD-NUMBERED posters

3:00-3:30PM BREAK WITH BEVERAGES

3:30-5:00PM POSTER SESSION II Contributors will be at EVEN-NUMBERED posters

6:00-7:00PM DINNER

 

7:30PM WORKSHOP: GENOMIC APPROACHES IN MAIZE

Speakers (listed alphabetically):

Jeff Bennetzen Comparative genomics, targeted on maize

Zac Cande An integrated map of cytological, genetic & physical information of maize

Ed Coe Our roots in the past, our flowering in the future

John Doebley Evolutionary genomics of maize

Hugo Dooner Use of the transposon Ac as a gene searching engine in the maizegenome

Keith Edwards Maize genomics at IACR Long Ashton Research Station

Rob Martienssen Target-selected Mutagenesis in Maize using Robertson's Mutator transposons.

Howard Rines Maize chromosome addition lines of oat and derived radiation hybrids as maize

genomics tools

Torbert Rocheford Genomic analysis of seed quality traits in maize

Virginia Walbot Maize gene discovery, DNA sequencing and phenotypic analysis

SATURDAY, 13 March

7:00-8:30 AM BREAKFAST

8:30-10:00AM SESSION #3 Chair: Becky Boston

TRANSPOSONS

8:30 Ryuji Ishikawa, Hirosaki Univ.

Structual Difference of RiceMutator and maize Mutator elements and the activity of RiceMutator

8:45 Cliff Weil, Univ. of Idaho

Ac/Ds transposition in yeast cells

9:00 Tom Brutnell, Oxford Univ.

Shotgun mutagenesis: A mapped-based approach to gene tagging in maize

POLLEN, EMBRYO, SEEDLING

9:15 Chris Chase, Univ. of Florida

Nuclear restorers-of-fertility disrupt essential mitochondrial gene expression in S male-sterile maize

9:30 Wolfgang Werr, Univ. of Köln

Embryo-specific mutants blocked in the radial organization of the proembryo fail in the establishment of meristems during maize embryogenesis

9:45 Lynne Jesaitis, UC Berkeley

Novel morphological mutants of the coleoptile

10:00-10:30AM BREAK WITH BEVERAGES

10:30-12:00PM SESSION #4 Chair: Neelima Sinha

CYTOGENETICS

10:30 Kelly Dawe, Univ. of Georgia

Structural (CPC) and regulatory (MAD2) components of the maize kinetochore

10:45 Gerd Weber, Univ. Hohenheim

Physical localization of molecular markers on maize chromosomes and their correlation to the genetic map

11:00 Zac Cande, UC Berkeley

Meiotic prophase chromosome behavior in maize and rye

EPIGENETICS

11:15 Elsbeth Walker, Univ. of Massachusetts

The role of the Doppia transposable element in r1 paramutation

11:30 Lyudmila Sidorenko, Iowa St. Univ.

Fragments of the P-RR promoter induce a paramutant-like state of the endogenous P-RR allele

11:45 Charles Papa, Univ. of Wisconsin

Sequence and function of a maize DNA methyltransferase

12:30-1:30PM LUNCH

1:30-3:00PM POSTER SESSION III Contributors will be at EVEN-NUMBERED posters

3:00-3:30PM BREAK WITH BEVERAGES

3:30-5:00PM POSTER SESSION IV Contributors will be at ODD-NUMBERED posters

4:30-6:00PM WORKSHOP: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND LICENSING

Speakers: Al Kriz Technology Transfer and Licensing Workshop

Bryan Renk Technology Transfer as it pertains to academic research

Nicholas Seay Basics of Patent Law for Plant Breeders

6:00-7:00PM DINNER

7:30-9:00 PM PLENARY TALKS Chair: Julie Vogel

7:30 Rich Jorgensen, Univ. of Arizona

Homology-based control and epigenetic inheritance of gene expression patterns in transgenic plants

8:15 Pat Schnable, Iowa St. Univ.

Molecular basis of fertility restoration in cmsT maize

 

SUNDAY, 14 March

7:00-8:30 AM BREAKFAST

8:30-10:00AM SESSION #5 Chair: Ben Bowen

TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS

8:30 Erich Grotewold, Ohio St. Univ.

The maize R2R3 Myb gene family

8:45 Wes Bruce, Pioneer Hi-Bred

mRNA profiling of the flavanoid genes controlled by inducible transcriptional factors, CRC and P

9:00 Don McCarty, Univ. of Florida

Structure and evolution of the B3 protein superfamily in plants

DEVELOPMENT 2

9:15 Yutaka Sato, Nagoya Univ.

Analysis of the functions of class1 type kn1-like homeobox genes

9:30 Mike Freeling, UC Berkeley

Negative Regulation of homeobox genes lg3 and rs1

9:45 Peter Rogowsky, ENS-Lyon

Genes involved in early maize embryogenesis

10:00-10:30AM BREAK WITH BEVERAGES

10:30-12:00PM SESSION #6 Chair: Kelly Dawe

SEX and RECOVERY

10:30 Helene Laparra, Yale Univ.

Cell death and cell protection genes in the maize sex determination pathway

10:45 Thomas Dresselhaus, Univ. of Hamburg

Gene regulation in male and female gametophytes before and after fertilization

11:00 Manish Raizada, Stanford Univ.

Mutator in Transgenic Maize: RescueMu and 35S-mudrA, New Biology and Biotecnology

BIOCHEMICAL GENETICS

11:15 Pascale Williams, Oregon St. Univ.

Analysis of the Coproporphyrinogen III Oxidase Genes and Their Expression in Maize

11:30 Jinsheng Lai, Rutgers Univ.

Eliminating Genetic Variability of the High Methionine Phenotype in Maize

11:45 Heping Cao, Iowa St. Univ.

Identification and biochemical characterization of starch synthase activity coded for by dull1

POSTERS

I. CYTOGENETICS

Presenter

Title

1

Peter Carlton

Localization and morphology of centromeres in meiotic prophase

2

Amie Franklin

Maize desynaptic 2, a chromosome-pairing meiotic mutant, has aberrant Rad51 filaments when chromosomes pair

3

Evelyn Hiatt

Characterizing Ab10-mediated meiotic drive in maize

4

Bryan Kindiger

Apomixis and seed fertility in maize x Tripsacum wide hybridizations

5

Dan Maillet

Nucleolar fusion in Zea mays L.

6

Gerd Weber

Physical localization of molecular markers on maize chromosomes and their correlation to the genetic map

7

Hong-Guo Yu

The maize homolog of the cell cycle checkpoint protein Mad2 reveals kinetochore substructure and contrasting mitotic and meiotic localization patterns

II. DEVELOPMENTAL GENETICS

8

Bruce Abedon

Cell wall composition in juvenile and adult leaves of B73 and De811

9

Yvonne Asuncion-Crabb

CRINKLY 4-like Receptors in Zea mays and Arabidopsis thaliana

10

R. Frank Baker

Efforts to clone the glossy early flowering gene

11

Philip W. Becraft

Signaling epidermal differentiation.

12

Wolfgang Werr

Embryo-specific mutants blocked in the radial organization of the proembryo fail in the establishment of meristems during maize embryogenesis.

13

David Braun

Structure/function analysis of LIGULELESS1

14

John Anderson

The structural analysis of ms22, a male-sterile mutant of maize

15

Erica Unger

DAM-mediated male-sterility is influenced by the position of the anther-specific promoter relative to the selectable marker gene.

16

Joe Colasanti

What is id1 doing in the maize leaf?

17

Xiangqin Cui

The physiological role of Rf2 independent of its role as a cms-T restorer

18

Matthew Evans

Mutations with maternal gametophyte effects on kernel development

19

Chris Giedt

LAG1-O developmental control of Ac/Ds transposition

21

Rachelle Goldman

Response of maize root tips versus axes to hypoxia and anoxia

22

Tao Guo

Maize dek1 gene is a candidate member of the crinkly4 signal transduction pathway

23

Sabine Hantke

Isolation and expression analysis of cim1, a nucellus-specific gene in maize

24

F. Hochholdinger

Genetic analysis of root initiation in maize

25

Jay B. Hollick

The rmr6 locus affects pl paramutation and plant development

26

Erin Irish

Rejuvenation by meristem culture restores hypomethylation at Pl-blotched

27

Nick Kaplinsky

Analysis of rgo1 and rgo2 - a progress report

28

Akio Kato

Single fertilization in maize

29

Sharon Kessler

Analysis of Xcl, a mutation affecting planes of cell division

30

Debbie Laudencia-Chingcuanco

Indeterminate floral apex 1 is required for meristem determinacy and meristem identity

31

Jun Lim

Zmscarecrow reveals that positional information plays a pivotal role in radial patterning during quiescent center regeneration

32

Mark Lubkowitz

A modified yeast screen to identify downstream targets of roughsheath1 and liguleless3

33

Sheila McCormick

Odd-man-out, dyad pollen and raring-to-go: cool names for cool pollen mutants in Arabidopsis

34

Mike Scanlon

The narrow sheath duplicate-factor mutations prevent recruitment of a subset of leaf founder cells.

35

Paula McSteen

barren inflorescence2 : Genetic analysis

36

Miso Mitkovski

Balancing cell division and expansion: Further characterizaton of tan-py

37

Michael Muszynski

The use of apical dominance mutants to identify signals coordinating ear formation and growth

38

Jennifer Nelson

Leaf epidermal patterning mutants: abaxial/adaxial switching in the dorsiventral polarity mutant Rolled and abnormal stomatal complexes in Intarsia*.

39

Woong June Park

Two new maize mutants with defects in lateral root elongation

40

Leonore Reiser

Identification of extragenic enhancers of the knotted1 loss of function phenotype.

41

Carol Rivin

Maternal effect and zygotic genes modify a shootless embryo phenotype

42

George Theodoris

DNA binding studies on the Rough Sheath2 protein

43

Jeff Thornsberry

Recovery of photosynthetic function coincident with an increase in normal mitochondrial nad4 genes during maturation of defective leaf sectors of NCS2 heteroplasmic plants.

44

Miltos Tsiantis

The rough sheath2 gene controls knox expression and leaf cell fate in maize

45

Randall Tyers

Insertional mutations in knotted1-like homeobox genes

46

P. Leszek D. Vincent

Improving the effective use of the maize genome database for plant breeders, developmental biologists and other users

III. MOLECULAR GENETICS

47

Donald L. Auger

Nuclear gene dosage affects the expression of mitochondrially encoded cytochrome oxidase genes in maize

48

Richard Thompson

Components of the maize GCN5/ADA2 coactivator complex

49

Robert McK. Bird

A cpSSR survey of Zea: confirmation and surprises in a test array

50

Erich Grotewold

The maize R2R3 Myb gene family

51

Wes Bruce

mRNA profiling of the flavanoid genes controlled by inducible transcription factors, CRC and P

52

Charles C Carey

Regulation of the anthocyanin pathway by a3

53

Ching-Chun Chang

Nucleus-encoded T7-like RNA polymerases in mitochondria and chloroplasts

54

Todd Christensen

Identification and characterization of Rop GTPases in Zea mays

55

Pietro Ciceri

The activity of the maize Opaque-2 transcriptional activator is regulated diurnally

56

Suzy Cocciolone

Analysis of transgenic plants reveals new information about old genes

57

Craig Coleman

Transgenic expression of zein proteins in tobacco seed

58

Jennifer L. Conner

Adapt or fry: physiological and genetic analysis of responses to ultraviolet radiation

59

C Dietrich

Genetic characterizations of cuticular wax accumulation

60

Jane E. Dorweiler

Mutations that prevent paramutation and correlations with chromatin structure

61

Snezana Drinic Mladenovic

Embryo salt soluble proteins as markers for genetic diversity among maize inbred lines

62

Xiaowu Gai

EST assembly and annotation tools and a maize EST database

63

Wolfgang Goettel

P1-rr is paramutable when heterozygous with the paramutagenic P1-pr allele

64

Gregorio Hueros

Isolation of a putative transcriptional activator, mzMRP-1, specifically expressed at the transfer cells of the maize endosperm

65

Baozhu Guo

Preliminary identification and sequences of a gene in the sh2-a1 region that affects silk maysin concentration in maize silks

66

Jose F. Gutierrez-Marcos

Screening for imprinted genes in maize endosperm

67

Linda Harris

Genes induced during Fusarium graminearum infection of maize

68

Tim Helentjaris

Some insights into how modern genomics technologies are changing the practice of genetics

69

Reinhard Kunze

Characterization of mus1 and mus2, two mutS homologous genes from Zea mays

70

John Fowler

Novel C-terminal sequences are required for efficient targeting of a maize Rho family GTPase to the plasma membrane

71

Michael McMullen

The identification of a second salmon silk gene

72

Shailesh Lal

In vivo analysis of pre-mRNA splicing mutants at the Brittle-2 and Shrunken-2 loci in maize

73

Luciana L. B. Lanza

RFLP as an invaluable tool for revealing tropical maize heterotic subgroups and predicting single cross hybrids yield performance

74

Carolyn Lawrence

Molecular analysis of Zmkin1 and other maize kinesin-like proteins

75

Yong Li

Phylogenetic relationships within Tripsacum as detected by RAPD variation

76

Feng Liu

Maize aldehyde dehydrogenase gene family

77

Zhengrong Ma

Molecular analysis of dek(defective kernel) mutant in maize

78

Barbara Basso

An integrated map of a portion of chromosome 3L, in proximity of the ys3 locus

79

Beiquan Mou

Inheritance of Su1 transgenes in maize plants

80

Rebecca Mroczek

Analysis of the organization of the abnormal-10 chromosome of maize

81

Pierre-Jean Ripoll

A maize BAC library from the european flint inbred line F2

82

Paula Olhoft

The maize maintenance methylase gene Zmet1 and changes in 5-methylcytosine levels throughout development

83

Tadas Panavas

Structural features associated with paramutagenicity and paramutability of the r1 locus

84

Charles M. Papa

Sequence and function of a maize DNA methyltransferase

85

Gregorio Hueros

A maize homologue of the prokaryotic CMP-KDO synthethase gene complements a bacterial cell wall synthesis mutant

86

Yutaka Sato

Analysis of the functions of class1 type kn1-like homeobox genes

87

Gregorio Segal

Four novel basic leucine zipper cDNAs from maize endosperm

88

David Selinger

The B-Bolivia allele has multiple, epigenetically heritable states that have distinct aleurone expression phenotypes, but do not differ in plant expression

89

Natalya Sharopova

Abundance and variation of imperfect simple sequence repeats in maize ESTs

90

Lyudmila Sidorenko

Fragments of the P-RR promoter induce a paramutant-like state of the endogenous P-RR allele

91

Russ Spangler

Sorghum generic limits and species delimitation using ndhf and morphology

92

Maike Stam

Identification of sequences at the b locus that are required for paramutation

93

David Stevenson

A hybridisation based screen for identifying gene knock-outs in maize

94

Liangjiang Wang

Display of Miniature Inverted repeat Transposable Elements in maize

95

Christine D. Chase

Nuclear restorers-of-fertility disrupt essential mitochondrial gene expression in S male-sterile maize

96

Suk-Hwan Yang

The expression of a synthetic codon adjusted porcine alpha-lactalbumin gene in maize

97

Hong Yao

Characterization of meiotic recombination within the a1-sh2 interval

98

Peifen Zhang

Isolation and characterization of a second P gene in maize: another contributor to maysin synthesis?

IV. BIOCHEMICAL GENETICS

99

Robert A. Bouchard

Quantification and localization of 18kD HSP mRNA accumulated during metal-ion insult of maize seedling radicles and plumules.

100

Heping Cao

Identification and biochemical characterization of the starch synthase activity coded for by dull1

101

Miguel Cervantes-Cervantes

Isolation of geranylgeranylpyrophosphate synthase (GGPPS) cDNA clones from maize endosperm by color complementation in Escherichia coli.

102

Carla P. Cota

Development of rice transformation for analysis of maize transgenes

103

C.D. Goodman

The next step in the anthocyanin pathway: a novel Z. mays multi-drug resistance associated protein (mrp) regulated by the R & C1 transcription factors

104

J. M. Hernandez

Characterization of a maize gene encoding a conserved WD40 protein

105

Kathleen Newton

The NCS2 mitochondrial mutant has a partial respiratory complex I and enhanced expression of nucleus-encoded mitochondrial stress proteins

106

Jonathan Lightner

Production of a very-high amylose corn starch by inactivation of starch branching enzyme i in an amylose-extender mutant background

107

Paul D. Matthews

On golden pollen

108

Beom-Seok Seo

Interaction of branching enzymes in corn starch synthesis with enzymes in yeast glycogen synthesis

109

Subbaiah Chalivendra

Potential involvement of maize AIP in the anoxia-induced death of the root tip

110

Uta von Rad

Purification of two UDPG::benzoxazinone glucosyltransferases from maize seedlings

111

Pascale Williams

Analysis of the coproporphyrinogen III oxidase genes and their expression in maize

112

Jia Yu

Immunolocalization of carotenoid enzymes in maize

V. CYTOPLASMIC INHERITANCE

113

J. Clinton Bailey

Novel plasmid-like subgenomes are derived from the "main" mitochondrial DNA of P2 strain of maize

114

Chester L. Dewald

A novel cytoplasm for maize

115

Roger Wise

Positioning the Rf8 fertility restorer in the maize genome

VI. TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS

116

Scott Bercury

A molecular analysis of the structure and function of the Doppia transposable element

117

Joel Caren

Introns derived from insertions that duplicate host sequences

118

James Carey

Evolutionary analysis of retrotransposon insertion sites adjacent to specific genes within Zea

119

Alexandra Casa

MITEs, a novel class of "smart" molecular marker located preferentially in genic regions.

120

Ryuji Ishikawa

Structual difference of RiceMutator and maize Mutator element and the activity of RiceMutator

121

Shailesh Lal

A putative insertion at the Sh2 locus in maize mutant sh2-7527 lacks terminal repeats, does not make a duplication of host sequence and causes unique splicing of sh2 transcripts

122

Bailin Li

Mutator transposable elements preferentially insert into genes in the maize genome

123

Damon Lisch

Chromatin structure of MuDR elements.

124

Damon Lisch

Homologs of non-autonomous Mu elements

125

Damon Lisch

Sequence analysis of MuDR homologs.

126

Todd Matulnik

Analysis of a protein which binds a specific palindrome motif in the LTR of a class of retrotransposons in maize

127

Akemi Ono

Analysis of MURA and MURB localization

128

Manish Raizada

Mutator in transgenic maize: RescueMu and 35S-mudrA, new biology and biotecnology

129

Guo-Ling Nan

Maize gene discovery: A reverse genetic approach using a retrievable Mu tag (RescueMu)

130

Reinhard Kunze

Correlation of Ac/Ds element transposition with DNA methylation and replication

131

George Rudenko

Transposon diversity: characterization of new classes of MuDR-homologous elements from maize

132

Natascha Techen

Isolation of two new CACTA transposable elements (TE) from anthocyanin genes in maize

133

Nigel Walker

The toxicity of MuDR in E. Coli is mediated by the dnaY gene.

134

Clifford Weil

Ac/Ds transposition in yeast cells

135

Yongli Xiao

Transposon (Ac)-induced homologous recombination at maize P locus and in transgenic Arabidopsis

136

Hugo Dooner

Origination of Ds elements from Ac elements in maize: evidence for rare repair synthesis at the site of Ac excision

137

Jianbo Zhang

Nested deletions generated by non-linear transposition of Ac/fAc elements in maize

VII. QUANTITATIVE TRAITS

139

Georgia Davis

QTL for aflatoxin reduction in maize

140

Natalia de Leon

Twenty-four cycles of mass selection for prolificacy in the Golden Glow maize population

141

E. A. Lee

Dissecting maysin QTLs - elucidation of transcriptional regulation of the flavone pathway.

142

Suzanne Mueller

Identification of QTL for seed weight in a Krug Large Seeded inbred X B73 F2 population.

143

David F. Weber

Comparative recombination distances among varieties of Zea mays L.

144

Gad Yousef

Empirical evaluations of marker-assisted selection for improving quantitative traits in sweet corn.

VIII. GENOME STRUCTURE/SYNTENY

145

Mary Alleman

The origin of structural complexity at the maize r1 locus

146

C.A. Blakey

Tripsacum apomixis: one gene, two genes, three genes, more?

147

Chris Carson

Progress in the effort to map 3400 mutants

148

Ed Coe

Comprehensive genetic, physical, and database resources for maize

149

David Frisch

BAC library resource center for agricultural genomics

150

Susan Gabay-Laughnan

Restorer genes for CMS-S are present in the Zea mays subspecies mays, mexicana and parviglumis from Mexico

151

Toby Kellogg

Phylogeny and a new classification of the grass family (Poaceae)

152

Victor Llaca

Comparative genomics to study genome expansion in maize

153

Blake Meyers

Diversity and abundance of the gypsy-like group of LTR-retrotransposons in the corn genome

154

Mary Polacco

MaizeDB: integrated maize genome resource. Community curation, database interoperability, and comparative map displays

155

Gernot Presting

Development of a framework for sequencing the rice genome: fingerprinting and BAC end sequencing of the CUGI Nipponbare BAC library

156

Pablo Rabinowicz

Genetically filtered shotgun sequencing of complex eukaryotic genomes

157

David Selinger

The b locus has an unusually high frequency of nucleotide substitutions in the upstream region and contains a recombinational hotspot with distinct borders.